Update on Beneful Dog Food

February 27, 2015

With the Class Action lawsuit against Beneful pet food, I’ve received a number of emails and comments on this site questioning the safety of this food or sharing sad stories of dogs lost to something in the food.  Today, I received a link to a new article by Susan Thixton of Truth About Pet Food (http.truthaboutpetfood.com/what-we-do-know-about-beneful/) discussing the history of Beneful as she knows it.  I want to share some of her points with you here:

Ms. Thixton talked about some consumer-funded testing done in 2012 by another pet food safety advocate that found “10 different mycotoxins in one batch of Beneful Original.  The food was ranked as high risk due to the number and levels of mycotoxins in the food.  This testing also found several antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria in the dog food.  One of those strains, Pseudomonas, has been associated with putrid meat by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.”

Ms. Thixton went on to say that the food “contains animal fat, meat and bone meal, and animal digest, rendered ingredients that could include euthanized animals.  The food contains propylene glycol, a toxic ingredient. Chemical colors are included that are linked to cancers in lab animals.  Multiple grains are included that are sure to be genetically modified and treated with pesticides.”

The point Susan Thixton makes in her article is that we don’t know what will result from the cumulative effects of multiple questionable ingredients in this pet food.  Are the effects magnified as the dog consumes more and more of the food?  With so many potential problem ingredients, one has to wonder about the safety of Beneful.

The last point I want to make is that I tend to believe in the saying, “where there is smoke, there may be fire.”  When you know that other pet owners are talking and writing about dogs dying from eating a certain pet food and those numbers keep rising, common sense says to stay away from it!

Take this article to your veterinarian. Ask him or her for an opinion.  Read what consumeraffairs.com/pets/beneful.html has to say about the food in question.  I saw over 800 complaints on that site alone.  Then read the BARKS & MEOWS page at the top of this website and know what to look for in dog food when you shop.  Google the brand that looks good to you and search for complaints or recalls to learn the foods history.  Talk to friends.  Visit a holistic pet store and ask questions.  Ask them for samples of various healthy pet foods and try them on your dog before your buy.  No matter how healthy the pet food is, if your dog won’t eat it, there is no point in purchasing it.  Manufacturers provide small packages of samples of their products free to retail pet supply stores.  Or you can email me at carol@seniorsforpets.org for my personal recommendations.  You actually can find premium pet foods at prices lower than you see in some pet stores.

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