Chicken Jerky Dog Treats

August 7, 2012

In 2007, reports surfaced from several sources about the possibility of chicken jerky dog treats manufactured in China being tainted.  The reports and complaints to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) are not going away.  An increase in the number of reports of dogs getting sick after eating the treats made in China has caused the FDA to issue even more warnings against feeding said treats to dogs.

No products have been recalled, but the pet food industry is concerned about the potential link between the treats and kidney disease in dogs.  The FDA first issued a warning in 2007.  Illness reports tapered off until 2011,  when urine tests on sick dogs indicated Fanconi syndrome.  Fanconi syndrome shows up as kidney malfunction.  www.fda.gov/forConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm092802.htm.

Pet owners are pushing for removal of the chicken jerky treats from China from retail stores.  Even Ohio Senator Dennis Kucinich said, “The FDA has not done its job…We’re working on a law that would require affixing labels to products if questions have been raised about the product being connected to any deaths.  The public has a right to know what’s going on here.”  www.wsvn.com/features/articles/carmelcase/MI95789.

Lawsuits have been filed against two of the big pet food manufacturers, and people are growing more and more concerned.   No specific products have been recalled or implicated because “we have not detected a contaminant,”  Spokeswoman Tamara Ward says, “The FDA continues to actively investigate the problem and its origin.  If we find evidence of any contaminant, the FDA will take appropriate action and notify the public.”

In light of increasing reports of sick dogs, it makes sense to avoid chicken jerky treats and any other pet food manufactured in China.  The questionable treats are sold in many retail stores, and you must read the label on the package to be sure of its country of origin.

Chicken Jerky Treats Made in China(Source of graphic unknown)

Numerous brands of pet treats are involved, but the ones shown in the graphic above are perhaps the best known.  According to every report I’ve read, the manufacturers whose pet treats are made in China are conducting their own tests and chemical analyses to determine if there is a contaminant in the products but so far, nothing has surfaced.  Because of the pet food catastrophe in 2007 involving melamine in various pet food brands manufactured in China, the buying public is understandably concerned and more aware of the potential for disaster.  Pet owners and veterinarians are watching closely for FDA updates on this subject.

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